The Red Knight - Miles  CameronTries unsuccessfully to mine the "grimmer" Abercrombie's and Mark Lawrence's headspace by emulating a very colloquial dialogue style, specially among their military characters. 

The structure of the book is in short sections from multiple points-of-view and it doesn't work well in terms of narrative flowing. There are a ton of characters of all kinds, most notably the title hero, the Red Knight (about whom we find out in due time most everything about parentage and upbringing with the rest being implied...lol), the real bad boy "Bad Tom" Lachlan, the two sorcerers Thorn and Harmodius, the abbess who hires the Red Knight to protect her important convent/fortress, Queen Desiderata, some local and foreign knights, a few nasty daemons - these are powers of the wild and guardians of the outwallers, an escaped slave who becomes a member of the Sossag one of the "outwallers" indian like tribes and not least a wise and very powerful Dragon...

The much-praised military aspects of the book become somewhat repetitive at the beginning, in the middle and at the end... Also as in most fantasies, the separation of the main hero and his love interest looks really artificial to say the least.

The usual fantasy fodder that's being written nowadays just to sell books. Nothing new under the sun...

All in all not worth reading. I should have known better... Better stick to the usual "culprits": George R. R. Martin, Gene Wolfe, Joe Abercrombie and Guy Gavriel Kay, just to name four of my favourites.