sábado, agosto 02, 2014

"A Bullet for Carlos" by Giacomo Giammatteo

A Bullet for Carlos - Giacomo Giammatteo
Arthur C. Clarke may have been the worst great writer I can think of (probably along with Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov).

Clarke’s prose is workmanlike at the best of times, his characters are emotional ciphers, his dialogue is seldom real, his plots are more like giant landscapes than any credible unfolding of events involving real people, and style-wise he happily breaks every rule of Good Writing.

Clarke doesn't care. And know what? Neither do I. Some of things Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein wrote are still among my favourite novels.

In genre fiction, if I pick up any modern novel, basically the villains are just cardboard characters that have to be locked up or arrested or shot by the good guys. Nowadays modern Crime Fiction is an entertainment genre and it’s huge business (in Britain around 30% of all the fiction published belongs to the Crime Fiction section). Crime Fiction is all about resolution, which you don’t get in real life. Although I have a bit of a reaction to this, it can be very good entertainment if it’s done properly.

Along with lots of other readers, I like the way I get sucked into Clarke’s bigger-than-space narratives. I get excited along with his cardboard but engaging characters in the vast spaces, unique vistas he shows us.

When I read Clarke, I know I’m reading a fellow geek, a non-artsy-fartsy guy, who was able to produce the wonderful trick of writing Fiction that resembled literary work. Nay, I must not think thus…. Something that is literary. Better than, in some cases.

This long preamble takes us to the novel at hand: “A Bullet for Carlos” by Giacomo Giammatteo. Was the constant POV shifting annoying sometimes? Absolutely. Does Giammatteo always move skillfully between the main character’s first-person account (Connie’s) and omniscient third-person narration? No, not by a long shot. Is it comparable with the best Crime Fiction out there today? Nope. Is it highfalutin literature? No. But it was all so damn fun. 

4 comentários:

Giacomo Giammatteo disse...

Manuel: the review states it is for A Bullet For Carlos, by Giacomo Giammatteo, but the review is for Arthur C. Clarke

Manuel Antão disse...

The review is for "A Bullet for Carlos." You're not reading the review properly.

I'll post here the relevant section for clarity's sake:

"
[..]

When I read Clarke, I know I’m reading a fellow geek, a non-artsy-fartsy guy, who was able to produce the wonderful trick of writing Fiction that resembled literary work. Nay, I must not think thus…. Something that is literary. Better than, in some cases.

This long preamble takes us to the novel at hand: “A Bullet for Carlos” by Giacomo Giammatteo. Was the constant POV shifting annoying sometimes? Absolutely. Does Giammatteo always move skillfully between the main character’s first-person account (Connie’s) and omniscient third-person narration? No, not by a long shot. Is it comparable with the best Crime Fiction out there today? Nope. Is it highfalutin literature? No. But it was all so damn fun."

Book Stooge disse...

Gia,
I'd like to discuss this rationally, but since you can't be bothered to even read the review properly, what's the point?

The reviewer gave you a glowing review [just in case you're too stupid to find it, read the last sentence] and you come and criticize the review? Are you a phracking crack head? Are you trying to drive fans away and make even potential fans think you are an idiot?

What he writes is NONE of your business. It is NOT your place to come and "correct" what he wrote. You don't like it? Tough. You put your book out for ANYBODY to read and review. You don't get to dictate reviews. You might think you do since it appears that you are a Good Reads author, but let me tell you, out here in the REAL world, we reviewers don't put up with authors acting like gestapo and thought police.

Now, that might seem a bit harsh, considering your actual wording. But I am referring to your insidious thought process that led you to even comment in the first place. People like you are the ones who allow organizations like the Gestapo, the KKK and ISIS to flourish. You resent freedom of speech and thought and anything outside of your narrow field must be eliminated. Disagreement is one thing. But you aren't disagreeing with this review. You are trying to remove it, to silence it, to censor it.

Finally, to be doing this 2 YEARS after the review was published? What is your brain damage? Are you really this socially inept, this insecure? You didn't stumble across this, you had to search it out. Which means you are a narcissist of the worst sort.

Antao, sorry for going off like this on YOUR blog. But indie scumbag authors who think that they're little gods is one of those things that just pushes my buttons.

Giacomo Giammatteo disse...

Dear Book Stooge: (What an appropriate name) For your information, the moment I was made aware of my mistake, I sent an email apologizing to Antao, and I also advised the Goodreads Librarians of my error. The reason I didn't make note of it before is because I don't troll the review sites. I only saw it because it was brought to my attention by a reader, who obviously did the same thing as I--read the first few sentences and assumed it was the wrong book. If you're interested, ask Antao for the email I sent him. the first one was not full of vitriol. I simply stated that I felt he had left the review for the wrong book. i don't care what anyone leaves as a review. I am of the opinion that they are all good for business. Even what many consider to be 'bad' reviews can be viewed as good for business. So, once again, Antao, my apologies. It is my policy not to comment on any reviews, and I didn't comment on the content of this one. Nor will I.